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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 10:36 am 
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A set of stock ignition coils after removal from the bracket and now cleaned. After testing the ohms I then replaced the old hard HT leads and fitted new ones which were then glued in. The stock harness wires to each coil were ok on this set so I left them.

Image
Clean coil with new HT lead closeup view.

Image
After the HT leads were replaced, some protective sleeves now need to be added to prevent shafing again the frame rails under the tank just as the originals had.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 3:00 am 
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Country: CANADA
Bikes owned: 1976 SUZUKI GT 250A
where did you find the two coloured wires?

thnaks

tj


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 3:17 am 
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Bikes owned: 1976 SUZUKI GT 250A
Suzsmokeyallan wrote:
Here I have a front main harness assembly for a Buffalo, its the usual looking suspect bought off of Ebay as part of a whole harness and its related parts.
This one is a late version type as it has the round pin type of socket by the ign coils connections.
I'm also going to modify this for a few improvements over the stock harness that will make it better than how it was.

The list of things done will be along these lines:
Strip all the tape and sheathing off.
Remove all the sockets and clean them and the connectors, suspect ones will be replaced.
Test the wires for continuity and repair any issues.
Retape it and fit new sheathing.

The upgrades will be:
Change some of the sockets to a different style for a better interface.
Change some of the wires to a different gauge for improved current flow.


Image
The harness as it was bought, 30 plus years old



Image
The tapes coming off and its got some visual problems, dirty connectors, corrosion in the terminals, and of course a melted one.


Image
The worlds longest Buffalo horn wires as fitted from the factory and then taped up in a bundle. I have not undone these but they are easily two feet long. How about a horn on the front fender tip for a change as this could reach there easily. What were they thinking?


Image
This socket was the one from the gear indicator harness that I temporarily swapped out as I needed one that had good clips.


Image
The main harness connectors, the white one above is the main power wires from the rear harness and battery. You can see the red and orange coloured ones are faded, which means this bike was somewhere out in the open with the tank off for quite a while.
This is a very weak point on these harnesses and usually these are burnt up or showing signs of melting, it definitely needs an upgrade.



Image
The ignition wire socket to the switch, as usual its melted and will be upgraded, this is also a common problem.


Image
Another view of the same melted socket, this is very dangerous as it sits inside the H.L bucket, which means there's grounded metal all around it.


Just so you know, I've got some other work to do for restoration purposes so I'll get to this when I have some spare time and keep you updated accordingly.



have to ask because i don't know..how to you test the wires?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 4:39 am 
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World Superbike
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Location: The Republic of South Yorkshire
Country: England
Bikes owned: 2 x GT550s GT750, T200, TC200
TJCOOL wrote:
have to ask because i don't know..how to you test the wires?


Use a decent multimeter on 'Ohms' - Ω - and put the leads together to see what resistance is in the leads. Remember that number, it should be very low, like 0.1Ω (ish) if you have decent quality test leads.
Now test the wire you want to know the condition of WITH NO POWER ON IT.
If it has power on it, you could blow the tester fuse or even bugger it up completely if it's a cheap one.
Now subtract the test lead number from the wire number and that is the resistance of the wire.
This should also be very low - if it gets over 0.5Ω, there's a bad connection somewhere, the wire is very thin, or the wire is partly degraded/broken.
Note that on short runs of wire, the resistance will be almost the same for thick and thin wires, but if you intend carrying heavier currents (spotlights or air horns for instance) you need thicker wires and better connectors to carry the current.

In case you are wondering, I'm a recently retired Electrical Engineer, but only been in that trade for about 49 years, so still learning!!

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 5:01 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2016 5:14 am
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Bikes owned: 1976 SUZUKI GT 250A
Alan H wrote:
TJCOOL wrote:
have to ask because i don't know..how to you test the wires?


Use a decent multimeter on 'Ohms' - Ω - and put the leads together to see what resistance is in the leads. Remember that number, it should be very low, like 0.1Ω (ish) if you have decent quality test leads.
Now test the wire you want to know the condition of WITH NO POWER ON IT.
If it has power on it, you could blow the tester fuse or even bugger it up completely if it's a cheap one.
Now subtract the test lead number from the wire number and that is the resistance of the wire.
This should also be very low - if it gets over 0.5Ω, there's a bad connection somewhere, the wire is very thin, or the wire is partly degraded/broken.
Note that on short runs of wire, the resistance will be almost the same for thick and thin wires, but if you intend carrying heavier currents (spotlights or air horns for instance) you need thicker wires and better connectors to carry the current.

In case you are wondering, I'm a recently retired Electrical Engineer, but only been in that trade for about 49 years, so still learning!!



my meter has two settings for Ω's..X1K and X10....which one of these will give me the readings I need to take? When I do the leads test..touch them together?..i don't know!...they go off the chart for the Ω's readings..for both settings..maybe i have a cheap meter..


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 6:09 am 
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World Superbike
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Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:50 am
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Location: The Republic of South Yorkshire
Country: England
Bikes owned: 2 x GT550s GT750, T200, TC200
TJCOOL wrote:
my meter has two settings for Ω's..X1K and X10....which one of these will give me the readings I need to take? When I do the leads test..touch them together?..i don't know!...they go off the chart for the Ω's readings..for both settings..maybe i have a cheap meter..


Sounds like you may have an inexpensive :wink: meter - mine is a good Fluke meter that autoranges so it sorts itself out.
Use the X1 for wiring and X10 for coils etc.
The reading you have when nothing is connected is usually 'INF' or ∞ (like an 8 on it's side). You can take one wire out of the meter terminal and touch the free end of the test lead still connected, to the empty tester terminal then and see if there is a bad lead - you are only testing one lead at a time then.
It's always good practice to check the leads for continuity every time you use a tester, just in case a lead decides to give up the ghost, or the fkup fairy works her magic while you aren't looking!
If the leads don't pan out good, you may have blown the fuse by using the meter on ohms and testing a power circuit.
Make sure you use the same size fuse as original to keep the tester working, using a nail or silver foil temporary fuse will end in tears.

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But I'm quite certain that what you thought you understood wasn't what I actually meant.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 7:48 am 
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On the main road
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2016 5:14 am
Posts: 152
Country: CANADA
Bikes owned: 1976 SUZUKI GT 250A
Alan H wrote:
TJCOOL wrote:
my meter has two settings for Ω's..X1K and X10....which one of these will give me the readings I need to take? When I do the leads test..touch them together?..i don't know!...they go off the chart for the Ω's readings..for both settings..maybe i have a cheap meter..


Sounds like you may have an inexpensive :wink: meter - mine is a good Fluke meter that autoranges so it sorts itself out.
Use the X1 for wiring and X10 for coils etc.
The reading you have when nothing is connected is usually 'INF' or ∞ (like an 8 on it's side). You can take one wire out of the meter terminal and touch the free end of the test lead still connected, to the empty tester terminal then and see if there is a bad lead - you are only testing one lead at a time then.
It's always good practice to check the leads for continuity every time you use a tester, just in case a lead decides to give up the ghost, or the fkup fairy works her magic while you aren't looking!
If the leads don't pan out good, you may have blown the fuse by using the meter on ohms and testing a power circuit.
Make sure you use the same size fuse as original to keep the tester working, using a nail or silver foil temporary fuse will end in tears.



that test returns same off-the-charts readings..maybe i should not be so cheap and buy a good one..fluke models are usual quite dear aren't they?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 8:04 am 
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World Superbike
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Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:50 am
Posts: 2232
Location: The Republic of South Yorkshire
Country: England
Bikes owned: 2 x GT550s GT750, T200, TC200
TJCOOL wrote:
that test returns same off-the-charts readings..maybe i should not be so cheap and buy a good one..fluke models are usual quite dear aren't they?


The thing is, you don't need an expensive meter for 'home/garage' use, just a good quality one. Some fluke models are expensive, but quality wise they are all OK.
Even something like THIS is OK. I had one until a couple of years ago when it got stolen.
If you go second hand, just make sure all the segments on the display work.

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But I'm quite certain that what you thought you understood wasn't what I actually meant.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 5:54 pm 
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Location: Mostly Barbados, sometimes Florida and western Canada
Thanks for you comments guys, here how that front harness looked once it was upgraded and restored. I left the two factory earth crimps but the ones normally seen on the power distribution section are now hidden internally since all of that wiring was replaced and upgraded.

Image
Sockets closeup view,,, from the bottom, the left handlebar switch socket, above that is the ignition switch socket, then the park/gauge wire socket is next to the headlight socket. Next up is the front indicator wires and next to them is the right side handlebar switch socket, next to that socket is the front brake light socket which I replaced for a smaller two pin type later on. Then the horn wires, orange and green, the park light wire, brown and a double earth next to that. Then theres the two gauge bulb sockets (blue) and the temp gauge bulb socket blue above it. Finally, partially hidden under the temp gauge socket is the warning panel socket since this is for a 74 to 77 model.

Image
Rear portion of the front harness with upgrades and changes.

Image
Front harness assembly.

Image
A few restored /upgraded GT750 front harnesses.

_________________
Two strokes, its just that simple.

69 Suz U70
69 Suz T500
72 Suz GT750 cafe
74 Suz TS250
74 Suz GTXVR project
75 Suz RE5
75 Suz GT750
76 Suz TS400
76 Suz GT750
81 Suz GSX1100
86 Suz RG500x2
88 Hon CR500
93 Hon CBR900RR
98 Suz GSF1200x3
15 Kaw Ninja H2


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